An Epiphany and Anne Lamott

When we have an epiphany we know it. It is like the world pauses for a moment and a great understanding is delivered to us. It seems like the older I get, the more grand realizations I have.

These “grand understandings” would have been more useful much earlier than almost 50 years into my life. I would have made fewer mistakes and maybe been further along in life…more degrees, better paying job etc

The joy, however, is in the learning. We hear all the time that it is the process, not the product that is important. Learning by experience is really the only way. One of my favorite authors Anne Lamott says,

“Oh, my God. What if you wake up someday, and you’re 65 or 75, and you never got your novel or memoir written; or you didn’t go swimming in warm pools or oceans because your thighs were jiggly or you had a nice big comfortable tummy; or you were just so strung out on perfectionism and people-pleasing that you forgot to have a big juicy creative life, of imagination and radical silliness and staring off into space like when you were a kid? It’s going to break your heart. Don’t let this happen.”

She is by far one of the wisest people I know. She has had many epiphanies and helps me to understand the importance of being authentic.
New understandings help us be more compassionate and have more empathy which is a good thing. They happen when we least expect it and when we need it the most. I finally understand how my Grandmother would just take in what I was lamenting about and calmly share a tidbit of wisdom. She was just giving me a preview of what was to come.
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2 thoughts on “An Epiphany and Anne Lamott

  1. Thanks for sharing Anne Lamott’s wisdom here. This is a passage I love…and this part speaks most to me at the moment: “that you forgot to have a big juicy creative life, of imagination and radical silliness and staring off into space like when you were a kid?”

    A big, juicy creative life. What a fantastic goal for anyone at any age. And I love that she says “forgot” — not you couldn’t, but you FORGOT to do this wonderful thing. I really appreciate re-reading this in your post.

    Liked by 2 people

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